The only mixed school where boys wear skirts uniform

The school is situated in Nyakasura, off the Fort Portal-Bundibugyo Road, roughly 6.5 kilometers, north-west of the focal business area of Fort Portal.

The school was established by Scotsman Ernest Ebohard Calwell, a resigned maritime official, in 1926.

Calwell was an instructor at King’s College Budo when he dropped out with the head administrator there. They had contrasts on what uniform the understudies ought to wear. There were two understudies from Toro Kingdom at Buddo around then, by the names of Komwiswa and Byara.

They persuaded Calwell to come and request the Omukama from Toro for land to set up a school like Buddo in Toro. Rukirabasaija Daudi Kasagama Kyebambe III showed the Calwell three locales, out of which he chose Nyakasura. He chose Scottish kilts as the young men’s uniform.

Conversations via web-based entertainment started after it worked out that male students at a school in Uganda were constrained to wear “skirts” as a component of their uniform.

Individuals have been confused concerning why male understudies at Nyakasura School, a blended boarding and day secondary school in Western Uganda, are veering off from show and dressing in skirts.

Notwithstanding, the head of the school has mediated to put any misinformation to rest, claiming that the thought behind their school uniform is being misjudged.

The skirt-like dress is really a kilt, a customary Scottish men’s outfit, as per the school head.

He unveiled that Ernest William Calwell, a Scottish preacher who lived in the district during the pilgrim time, made the school in 1926.

“They are not skirts they are called Kilt as piece of clothing looking like a skirt generally worn by men in the Scottish culture,” he said.

“This school has an extraordinary history however the set of experiences is connected to Scotland and Colwell arrived at this area as a result of conflicts since he needed to acquaint this with schools yet individuals called the skirts yet they are not skirts they are called kilts.”

A Form Four understudy guarantees that, despite the fact that encountering society shock after entering the school, he at last became accustomed to the clothing standard as he came to grasp its significance.

“Typically when I discuss my uniform and when they see understudies putting on a kilt. More often than not they say that we are dressed like young ladies yet for me I approve of it since I have live with it for quite some time,” he said